ursulavernon


Once upon a time, there was a fetching young wolverine who, wearing her favorite red hood, went skipping through the fields, on the way to her grandmother’s house, carrying a basket of tasty goodies.*
A wolf, who was lurking at the edge of the woods, descended upon the young wolverine and said “Hello, little red riding wolverine, and where are you going in such a hurry?”
"To visit my grandmother," said the young wolverine, as demure and maidenly as a gravelly wolverine baritone can be.
"To visit your…to…grand…to..my goodness, what big teeth you have…" said the wolf, who seemed to have lost his train of thought somewhere.
The wolverine nodded.
"And what…big…claws…you have…" said the wolf, in much the same tone as General Custer commenting on the surprising number of locals at Little Bighorn.
The wolverine nodded.
"I’ll just bugger off, shall I?" said the wolf.
The wolverine nodded.
The wolf slunk gratefully back into the trees and hyperventilated quietly, and the little red riding wolverine skipped merrily through the woods to her grandmother’s house and they ate assorted rodents and watched cartoons and baked cookies happily ever after.  - Ursula Vernon
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*Pepperidge Farms’ Mixed Rodent Party Assortment, to be precise, a pretty good value for the money, although everybody always picks through and eats the gerbils first.

Once upon a time, there was a fetching young wolverine who, wearing her favorite red hood, went skipping through the fields, on the way to her grandmother’s house, carrying a basket of tasty goodies.*

A wolf, who was lurking at the edge of the woods, descended upon the young wolverine and said “Hello, little red riding wolverine, and where are you going in such a hurry?”

"To visit my grandmother," said the young wolverine, as demure and maidenly as a gravelly wolverine baritone can be.

"To visit your…to…grand…to..my goodness, what big teeth you have…" said the wolf, who seemed to have lost his train of thought somewhere.

The wolverine nodded.

"And what…big…claws…you have…" said the wolf, in much the same tone as General Custer commenting on the surprising number of locals at Little Bighorn.

The wolverine nodded.

"I’ll just bugger off, shall I?" said the wolf.

The wolverine nodded.

The wolf slunk gratefully back into the trees and hyperventilated quietly, and the little red riding wolverine skipped merrily through the woods to her grandmother’s house and they ate assorted rodents and watched cartoons and baked cookies happily ever after.  - Ursula Vernon

—————————

*Pepperidge Farms’ Mixed Rodent Party Assortment, to be precise, a pretty good value for the money, although everybody always picks through and eats the gerbils first.

ineptshieldmaid
lemonsharks:

airships-and-swords:

theracismrepellent:

go0fnugget:

During WWII, Japanese American soldiers were among the first to liberate the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. “U.S military commanders decided it would be bad public relations if Jewish prisoners were freed by Japanese American soldiers whose own families were imprisoned in American concentration camps,” therefore, these Japanese American soldiers who liberated hundreds of Jews are missing in our history lessons.

Wow. 

See, that implies that our history lessons actually talk about the fact that our government put Japanese Americans IN camps - and that by our silence we LET them. We condoned it. That’s on the heads of every white person who stood silently by and said nothing.
Also, yeah, not regularly taught.

The only reason it was taught to me was as part of California history.
Think on that for a minute.

lemonsharks:

airships-and-swords:

theracismrepellent:

go0fnugget:

During WWII, Japanese American soldiers were among the first to liberate the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. “U.S military commanders decided it would be bad public relations if Jewish prisoners were freed by Japanese American soldiers whose own families were imprisoned in American concentration camps,” therefore, these Japanese American soldiers who liberated hundreds of Jews are missing in our history lessons.

Wow. 

See, that implies that our history lessons actually talk about the fact that our government put Japanese Americans IN camps - and that by our silence we LET them. We condoned it. That’s on the heads of every white person who stood silently by and said nothing.

Also, yeah, not regularly taught.

The only reason it was taught to me was as part of California history.

Think on that for a minute.

guestsemiconductor

my favorite cold war story

  • Aisu: so
  • Aisu: new years eve
  • Aisu: at the american embassy in the ussr
  • Aisu: the americans are DRUNK
  • Aisu: and of course they know that the place is bugged to hell and back bc of course it is
  • Aisu: so they're kind of taunting the air
  • Aisu: HAHAHA BET THE RUSSIANS AREN'T HAVING HALF AS GREAT A PARTY
  • Aisu: etc etc etc
  • Aisu: suddenly.
  • Aisu: the phone rings.
  • Aisu: everyone goes quiet.
  • Aisu: someone finally picks it up.
  • Aisu: and all they hear is the sound of a champagne bottle being uncorked and poured.
  • Aisu: before whoever is on the other line hangs up.
  • Aisu: because the russians will not tolerate anyone trashing their partying skills.
allthingslinguistic
I call it the kilogram model of language, because there is literally a physical object in France by which the unit kilogram is defined, and there are in fact multiple and worryingly imperfect copies of it around the world. But what linguists have discovered is that language is definitely not like the kilogram. The only place where English really exists is in the minds of its everyday speakers. To the extent that varies geographically and socially, so does English. There are no imperfect copies.

Josef Fruehwald, What’s Wrong With “America’s Ugliest Accent”

The whole thing is worth reading, but I especially like this part. 

(via allthingslinguistic)

allthingslinguistic

allthingslinguistic:

I’m on Lexicon Valley explaining the subtle differences between the five different t sounds in English using internet puns (including “free tudoring” and “moist owlet” — thanks, tumblr!). 

For the sake of readability, I didn’t use much phonetics/phonology vocabulary on the Lexicon Valley post, so I’m going to link up the technical terms with the explanation here instead. Warning: what follows below is rather dense: you should read it in conjunction with the fun version

The general phenomenon of there being multiple versions of a sound (such as /t/) that you don’t notice is called allophony. The idea of /t/ in general is the phoneme, written in slashes //,and its variants are its allophoneswritten in square brackets [ ]. One of the things that distinguishes allophones is that they’re often found in predictable environments. For example:

  • Flapped/tapped t (IPA [ɾ]), as in “tutor”, is found between two vowels (intervocalically), when the second vowel isn’t stressed.
  • Glottalized t (IPA [t] with superscript ʔ or just glottal stop [ʔ]), as in bottle or button, is found in codas.
  • Unreleased t (IPA [t̚]), as in “moist” (sometimes), is optional and found at the end of a word (word-finally).
  • Aspirated t (IPA [t] with superscript h), as in “towel” or “participant”, is found at the beginnings of words (word-initially) for monosyllabic words, or at the beginnings of stressed syllables in general.
  • (not included in the article) Dental t (IPA [t̪]), as in “eighth”, is found before the voiceless dental fricative θ (in principle, dental d [d̪] could be found before ð but I’m not sure if there are any actual examples of this. Dental n, [n̪] is found before both θ and ð, as in “lengthen” although n before θ probably also gets devoiced). 

Flapping/tapping is a process that also happens with /d/, unreleasing is something that can happen with any stop /p t k b d g/, aspiration happens with voiceless stops /p t k/, and dentalization could happen with any alveolar, especially the stops /t d n/, but even maybe /s z l/. (Hey, notice how each of these are different natural classes!) Glottalization I don’t know as much about since it isn’t in my dialect, but I think it might be restricted to /t/…any Brits want to weigh in?

An analogy often used for allophones is Clark Kent vs Superman

medievalpoc

In 1306 an Ethiopian delegation came to Europe to seek an alliance with the “King of the Spains” against the Moslems. King Anfós IV of Aragon considered arranging a double marriage with the Negus of Ethiopia in 1428. And the Portuguese sent Pedro de Corvilhao to Ethiopia in 1487 on a similar mission.

Meanwhile the actual living experience of blacks in Europe appeared to be marked by smooth integration into European society, with the role of lower-class blacks determined very much by that of their masters or employers. The 140,000 slaves imported into Europe from Africa between 1450 and 1505 were a welcome new labor force in the wake of the Bubonic Plague.

On the whole, the blacks in Christian Iberia were not limited to servile roles; but they were also not influential as a group. The new slave population in Portugal worked in agriculture and fishing. Free blacks living in Loulé and Lagos in the southern edge of Portugal owned houses and worked as day laborers, midwives, bakers, and servants. Most were domestic servants, laborers (including those on ships and river craft), and petty tradesmen.

Some free blacks, especially women, became innkeepers. Blacks in Spain served as stevedores, factory workers, farm laborers, footmen, coachmen, and butlers. Male and female domestics apparently lived well compared to other lower-class people. Slaves could work in all the crafts, but could not join the guilds.

A few Africans active in the Americas during the early Iberian expansion were among returnees to Portugal and Spain from America and Africa from the 16th to the 18th centuries. These included free mulatto students, clerics, free and slave household servants, sailors, and some who attained gentlemen’s status. The use of many black women slaves as domestics and concubines led to mulatto offspring who received favored treatment, and in some instances, attained middle-class and even aristocratic status.

Problems in Studying the Role of Blacks in Europe by Allison Blakeley via Historians.org, American Historical Association (via medievalpoc)